Language: Uhjayi Script 1.0

Uhjayi script is a phonetic system that uses a symbol for each vowel-sound, consonant-sound, and consonant-vowel syllable. Each vowel and consonant-vowel pair has a root meaning that contributes to the overall meaning of any words or names formed with that sound; individual consonants have no inherent meaning. Old Uhjayi used a consistent pattern of vowels and consonant-vowel pairs, but over time, the language organically changed in its spoken form, often dropping the [A] or other vowel from the end of syllables like [JHA] and [NA] to leave only [JH] and [N]. Uhjayi script adapted to include symbols for the lone consonants, keeping the written language phonetic, but the meaning of the consonants is derived from the consonant-vowel syllables from whence they came. Commonly-used words have experienced this decay the most, while 'purer' words have suffered less. There are also dialects that sound differently than they are written; for example, one would pronounce emigonu as [EM][GO][NU] (aim-go-new) but write it as [E][MI][GO][NU] (a-me-go-new). The writing tends to stay less slurred than the spoken tongue.

There is no capitalization in this script, and punctuation consists of a line break between sentences, as well as a vertical or slightly slanted line between main clause and subclause of a sentence. Spacing takes the place of emphasizing marks such as italics or underlining, as well as exclamation points or ellipses. For this reason, single-symbol modifiers can be considered a part of a word. The closer a modifier to its subject, the more important or emphasized it is, and the more likely it will be considered a part of the subject word. The more compact the symbols of a sentence, the more emphasis on what is being conveyed; the more regular the spacing between words, the more neutral or formal the message; and the farther apart the spacing, the more uncertain or hesitant the message.

For the purposes of correct pronunciation among those reading Uhjayi written with English characters, hyphens will be employed between two vowels. For example, sa-u [physical sensation] is said as 'sah-oo', not 'sow' as sau might suggest.

You can find a complete list of all 227 written symbols below. All but the 22 individual consonants have a root meaning, which is charted on the root system page. (Please note that concrete nouns are not directly derived from those roots, though they make use of the same sounds and are often indirectly influenced by the root meanings.)

Hard Vowels (6): A, E, I, O, U, Y
Soft Vowels (3): EH, IH, UH
Hard Consonants (10): D, G, J, K, T, V, Z, CH, DH, KH
Soft Consonants (12): F, H, L, M, N, R, S, Y, JH, RH, SH, TH
Consonant-Vowel Syllables (196): DA, DE, DI, DO, DU, DY, DEH, DIH, DUH, FA, FE, FI, FO, FU, FY, FEH, FIH, FUH, GA, GE, GI, GO, GU, GY, GEH, GIH, GUH, JA, JE, JI, JO, JU, JY, JEH, JIH, JUH, KA, KE, KI, KO, KU, KY, KEH, KIH, KUH, LA, LE, LI, LO, LU, LY, LEH, LIH, LUH, MA, ME, MI, MO, MU, MY, MEH, MIH, MUH, NA, NE, NI, NO, NU, NY, NEH, NIH, NUH, RA, RE, RI, RO, RU, RY, REH, RIH, RUH, SA, SE, SI, SO, SU, SY, SEH, SIH, SUH, TA, TE, TI, TO, TU, TY, TEH, TIH, TUH, VA, VE, VI, VO, VU, VY, VEH, VIH, VUH, ZA, ZE, ZI, ZO, ZU, ZY, ZEH, ZIH, ZUH, HA, HE, HI, HO, HU, HY, HEH, HIH, HUH, YA, YE, YI, YO, YU, YEH, YIH, YUH, CHA, CHE, CHI, CHO, CHU, CHY, CHEH, CHIH, CHUH, DHA, DHE, DHI, DHO, DHU, DHY, DHEH, DHIH, DHUH, JHA, JHE, JHI, JHO, JHU, JHY, JHEH, JHIH, JHUH, KHA, KHE, KHI, KHO, KHU, KHY, KHEH, KHIH, KHUH, RHA, RHE, RHI, RHO, RHU, RHY, RHEH, RHIH, RHUH, SHA, SHE, SHI, SHO, SHU, SHY, SHEH, SHIH, SHUH, THA, THE, THI, THO, THY, THEH, THIH, THUH

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